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£49 games and the Nintendo Switch

£49 games and the Nintendo Switch

Something has worried me ever since the Nintendo Switch was announced. It is this. Nintendo will find it hard to convince me that paying £49 for a game on their system represents good value. “Oh!” You shriek, “Just because it is a console that can be played on the go doesn’t mean it is less valuable to the consumer or the industry. You’re prolly just a AAA snob.”

(comparison chart from TechRadar)

Here’s an analogy… Let’s say that you work in the car industry. Your company makes great software for braking systems and you sell that software to G-Wiz to put in their brand new low horse-powered micro car. Unfortunately, the G-Wiz can not get to a high enough speed to justify the use of your new brake system, but the McLaren F1 can make full use of it so you sell it to the high powered McLaren at the same price. The owners of the G-wiz are getting the same software, but will never be able to use it at the same level as the McLaren. Nintendo are trying to sell their games for the Switch as if they are running on a McLaren but they’re not, they are the G-Wiz.

It appears to me that any games being sold on the Switch that were released on other platforms will never be at the same level of performance that they reached on the consoles or PC’s they were originally designed to be played. So, why are people expected to pay the same price for them? You may argue, that the Nintendo Switch is a console first and a handheld second and that “The portability it provides will make up for the shortfall on technical proficiency.” That is possibly correct. However, shouldn’t that be factored into the price of the console itself and not individual software sales?

Let’s look at the price, £279. At £279 it is more expensive than the basic PS4 and basic Xbox One consoles. MORE EXPENSIVE while being technically inferior in every measurable way. Yes, the PS4 and Xbox One are sold “at a loss” but they make  that money back on the software sales. Nintendo Switch isn’t being sold at a loss and is still the same price as these technologically superior consoles despite having inferior hardware.

Nintendo, in classic Nintendo form, are trying to have their cake and eat it and I believe that this has hurt it.

A Nintendo currant cake. Not being eaten, currently

Games developed in-house and exclusive to the Switch will have no comparative yardstick on which to measure other consoles. Those games will have extra pressure on them to prove that Nintendo can still create great games. Since Nintendo’s Mario Kart 8 is being pre-purchased at £49 they will have to pull out all the stops to convince the world that £49 for a game on a technically inferior device is worth it.

What I am saying is, If Nintendo chooses to release Skyrim, The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth+, Setsuna and all other multiplatform games at the same price as other console and PC versions with very little or no improvements on previous releases, why would I buy it on a Switch? Just to be able to play it on a bus? Not me.

Our Year in Games 2016 – Chris (Part Four)

Our Year in Games 2016 – Chris (Part Four)

It’s New Year’s Eve, and about time that I finished my series of entries in Our Year in Games. Through the first two parts of my chatter, I covered games from the last couple of years that I had spent quite some time playing this year, while in Part Three I covered three highlights from games released this year. Now, I have three further games released in 2016 that I want to talk about. Hit the break dear reader for musings on Battlefield 1Hearts of Iron IV and Dishonored 2.

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Our Year in Games 2016 – Chris (Part Two)

Our Year in Games 2016 – Chris (Part Two)

 

Hello, and welcome to part two of my contribution to Our Year in Games 2016. I’m continuing my tale of my year in games by talking about another selection of games that weren’t necessarily released in 2016. I have played new games this year, honest! But a lot of older games have played some part in shaping my year in games. Here’s four of them.

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Our Year in Games 2016 – Chris (Part One)

Our Year in Games 2016 – Chris (Part One)

Welcome to Our Year in Games coming at you from Reticule Towers. I realise that we didn’t do any sort of yearly roundup for 2015, but we’re making up for it this year. I’ve invited a few old faces to take part in Our Year in Games, so hopefully you won’t just have me for company!

I’m probably going to split my tales across a few entries to cover the games from previous years that I’ve been playing this year as well as the games from 2016 that I’ve been playing. So read on and enjoy.

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Football Manager’s Hidden Gem

Football Manager’s Hidden Gem

There is a hidden gem to every edition of Football Manager, and one that most people are probably too afraid to dive into a check out. It comes free with the game every year, and hides away in the tools part of your Steam Library. Of course, I’m talking about the pre-game Editor, and it can change your experience with the game entirely.

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EGX 2016 – Day One Report

EGX 2016 – Day One Report

As another September draws near an end, I make my annual pilgrimage to the Eurogamer Expo, or EGX as they like to call it these days. I’ve travelled to London in the past, and more recently, have made my way to the NEC in Birmingham. For this year’s edition of the show, I am present for two day’s, and right here, right now in Birmingham, England *cheap pop*, I am delivering my Day One Report. Read on…

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The Joys of A Thief’s End

The Joys of A Thief’s End

Over the course of the past few months, I have marked off a few games which I probably should have played a few years ago. I am, as you might have guessed if you read my note on remasters from last week, talking about the Uncharted games. In a short period of time, I worked my way through Nathan Drake’s first three adventures, and have now completed his tale in A Thief’s End.

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Hitman’s Elusive Targets Are All Wrong, And Here’s Why.

Hitman’s Elusive Targets Are All Wrong, And Here’s Why.

I was actually quite late to jump on the Hitman bandwagon. The new one, that is. I’ve played and loved all previous installments of the series, but the news that Hitman 6 (or Hitman(TM) as it insists on being known) would be episodic was enough to put me off picking it up at launch. A few months later down the line and the positive reception of the first two of its sprawling open levels and multiple approaches was enough for me to take the plunge.

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